janetlin: (English language)
Age: 29 (my birthday was only a month ago and still that looks weird)
Where you grew up (Ages 0-18): northern California, USA

1. A body of water, smaller than a river, contained within relatively narrow banks: creek or stream. Both of which have long e's.

2. What the thing you push around the grocery store is called: Shopping cart.

3. A metal container to carry a meal in: Lunch box.

4. The thing that you cook bacon and eggs in: Skillet.

5. The piece of furniture that seats three people: Couch or sofa. Sofas are fancier.

6. The device on the outside of the house that carries rain off the roof: Gutters.

7. The covered area outside a house where people sit in the evening: Porch. If it's uncovered it's a patio, unless it's raised off the ground, then it's a deck.

8. Carbonated, sweetened, non-alcoholic beverages: Soda. Soft drinks on menus or if you're trying to sound hoity-toity.

9. A flat, round breakfast food served with syrup: Pancake. Unless it's an Eggo waffle. But I think it's asking for pancakes here.

10. A long sandwich designed to be a whole meal in itself: Sub.

11. The piece of clothing worn by men at the beach: Shorts or (swim) trunks.

12. Shoes worn for sports: Tennis shoes or tennies.

13. Putting a room in order: Cleaning/straightening.

14. A flying insect that glows in the dark: Firefly. We don't have these here.

15. The little insect that curls up into a ball: Roly-poly. Haven't seen one of those in a long time.

16. The children's playground equipment where one kid sits on one side and goes up while the other sits on the other side and goes down: Seesaw or teeter-totter.

17. How do you eat your pizza: Pointy end first. What does this have to do with English?

18. What's it called when private citizens put up signs and sell their used stuff: Garage or (less common) yard sale, estate sale if it's selling a deceased relative's stuff.

19. What's the evening meal?: Dinner.

20. The thing under a house where the furnace and perhaps a rec room are: Basement. We don't have these, either.

21. What do you call the thing that you can get water out of to drink in public places: Water fountain or drinking fountain. Scuttlebutt if you're around boat people.
janetlin: (English language)
Age: 29 (my birthday was only a month ago and still that looks weird)
Where you grew up (Ages 0-18): northern California, USA

1. A body of water, smaller than a river, contained within relatively narrow banks: creek or stream. Both of which have long e's.

2. What the thing you push around the grocery store is called: Shopping cart.

3. A metal container to carry a meal in: Lunch box.

4. The thing that you cook bacon and eggs in: Skillet.

5. The piece of furniture that seats three people: Couch or sofa. Sofas are fancier.

6. The device on the outside of the house that carries rain off the roof: Gutters.

7. The covered area outside a house where people sit in the evening: Porch. If it's uncovered it's a patio, unless it's raised off the ground, then it's a deck.

8. Carbonated, sweetened, non-alcoholic beverages: Soda. Soft drinks on menus or if you're trying to sound hoity-toity.

9. A flat, round breakfast food served with syrup: Pancake. Unless it's an Eggo waffle. But I think it's asking for pancakes here.

10. A long sandwich designed to be a whole meal in itself: Sub.

11. The piece of clothing worn by men at the beach: Shorts or (swim) trunks.

12. Shoes worn for sports: Tennis shoes or tennies.

13. Putting a room in order: Cleaning/straightening.

14. A flying insect that glows in the dark: Firefly. We don't have these here.

15. The little insect that curls up into a ball: Roly-poly. Haven't seen one of those in a long time.

16. The children's playground equipment where one kid sits on one side and goes up while the other sits on the other side and goes down: Seesaw or teeter-totter.

17. How do you eat your pizza: Pointy end first. What does this have to do with English?

18. What's it called when private citizens put up signs and sell their used stuff: Garage or (less common) yard sale, estate sale if it's selling a deceased relative's stuff.

19. What's the evening meal?: Dinner.

20. The thing under a house where the furnace and perhaps a rec room are: Basement. We don't have these, either.

21. What do you call the thing that you can get water out of to drink in public places: Water fountain or drinking fountain. Scuttlebutt if you're around boat people.
janetlin: (Languages)
How could I pass up one about language? From [livejournal.com profile] settiai

Where did you grow up? Northern California, USA.


Where we say hella )
janetlin: (Languages)
How could I pass up one about language? From [livejournal.com profile] settiai

Where did you grow up? Northern California, USA.


Where we say hella )
janetlin: (Procrastinate)
Got my midterm and my first project back in my Second Language Learning & Teaching class. I got a B on the test (missing three points out of twenty five will really goof you up), and aced the project. Yay! I was so nervous about that thing. It was bizarre and unlike any writing thing I've ever had to do, so at no point in the process of doing it was I sure that I was on the right track. _So_ nerve-wracking! But apparently I got it right, because the prof wrote notes all over my margins saying things like "good analysis" and "I agree."

Now we're on to the even _more_ terrifying second project which is ESL classroom observation and analysis. I know, no big surprise, it's only the name of the course. But this is the first of the "serious business, this is what it takes to become a teacher" kind of stuff that's really quite intimidating. Teaching was always just sort of in my nebulous future somewhere, but I'm quickly approaching the point that it's going to become a reality, or not happen at all. And if it doesn't happen I have no _earthly_ idea what I'm going to do with my life. So yeah. No pressure.
janetlin: (Procrastinate)
Got my midterm and my first project back in my Second Language Learning & Teaching class. I got a B on the test (missing three points out of twenty five will really goof you up), and aced the project. Yay! I was so nervous about that thing. It was bizarre and unlike any writing thing I've ever had to do, so at no point in the process of doing it was I sure that I was on the right track. _So_ nerve-wracking! But apparently I got it right, because the prof wrote notes all over my margins saying things like "good analysis" and "I agree."

Now we're on to the even _more_ terrifying second project which is ESL classroom observation and analysis. I know, no big surprise, it's only the name of the course. But this is the first of the "serious business, this is what it takes to become a teacher" kind of stuff that's really quite intimidating. Teaching was always just sort of in my nebulous future somewhere, but I'm quickly approaching the point that it's going to become a reality, or not happen at all. And if it doesn't happen I have no _earthly_ idea what I'm going to do with my life. So yeah. No pressure.
janetlin: (Teh sm4rt)
EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I just got over 100% on the quiz/test we took in Linguistics on Monday (longish for a quiz, shortish for a test). OMG so very yay!!

The professor was going through the grades, saying 16 (out of 20) was a B, 18 was an A, and "if you got above a twenty, I'd like to go on vacation next week, so would you mind teaching the class?" :D (And yes, even though he's British, he called it a vacation instead of a holiday. Mwa ha ha! You will be assimilated.)

Little snafu with the name (_when_ will that stop haunting me?): he told the department to drop me (married-name!me, that is), because I was no longer on his roster. Meep! So I told him that I am, in fact, still in the class, and that I am maiden-name!me. Then we did group work in class and he snuck out to his office and says he got it all straightened out. Though when I asked him which he had me down as now, he said he couldn't remember. But as long as he knows that both names apply to me, and as long as he puts the grades in whichever makes it end up on my transcript, it's all good. And I will start signing my tests with my maiden name, which makes me so much happier.
janetlin: (Teh sm4rt)
EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I just got over 100% on the quiz/test we took in Linguistics on Monday (longish for a quiz, shortish for a test). OMG so very yay!!

The professor was going through the grades, saying 16 (out of 20) was a B, 18 was an A, and "if you got above a twenty, I'd like to go on vacation next week, so would you mind teaching the class?" :D (And yes, even though he's British, he called it a vacation instead of a holiday. Mwa ha ha! You will be assimilated.)

Little snafu with the name (_when_ will that stop haunting me?): he told the department to drop me (married-name!me, that is), because I was no longer on his roster. Meep! So I told him that I am, in fact, still in the class, and that I am maiden-name!me. Then we did group work in class and he snuck out to his office and says he got it all straightened out. Though when I asked him which he had me down as now, he said he couldn't remember. But as long as he knows that both names apply to me, and as long as he puts the grades in whichever makes it end up on my transcript, it's all good. And I will start signing my tests with my maiden name, which makes me so much happier.
janetlin: (Stargate is a rerun)
You know it's bad when the top three entries on one's Friends page are one's own. My friends are either all really ded bored or really busy. Myself, I'm bored. So bored that I'm DOING MY HOMEWORK, zomg. And, like, going beyond just reading the assigned pages, and taking it upon myself to answer the Review of Terms and Concepts and End of Chapter questions that were _not_ assigned (and happening to get them right).

Aaaaaaagggggghhhh, whose brain is this inside my head?!

*This uncharacteristic industry is tempered by the facts that:
1) the homework in question is _linguistic_ homework. Of course I'm going to jump in and satisfy my own curiosity.
2) it is, after all, still only the first week of classes and I have yet to truly taste how intense homework is likely to get this semester.

I have the feeling that my Language, Culture, and Critical Thinking class is going to overlap in several areas with my Linguistics and the English Language class. The textbook for Critical Thinking is, after all, A Concise Introduction to Linguistics.
janetlin: (Stargate is a rerun)
You know it's bad when the top three entries on one's Friends page are one's own. My friends are either all really ded bored or really busy. Myself, I'm bored. So bored that I'm DOING MY HOMEWORK, zomg. And, like, going beyond just reading the assigned pages, and taking it upon myself to answer the Review of Terms and Concepts and End of Chapter questions that were _not_ assigned (and happening to get them right).

Aaaaaaagggggghhhh, whose brain is this inside my head?!

*This uncharacteristic industry is tempered by the facts that:
1) the homework in question is _linguistic_ homework. Of course I'm going to jump in and satisfy my own curiosity.
2) it is, after all, still only the first week of classes and I have yet to truly taste how intense homework is likely to get this semester.

I have the feeling that my Language, Culture, and Critical Thinking class is going to overlap in several areas with my Linguistics and the English Language class. The textbook for Critical Thinking is, after all, A Concise Introduction to Linguistics.
janetlin: (Laugh)
Hahahaha, my Linguistics and the English Language professor is _British_. But apparently he's been here for a while so his accent is sort of only halfway there, which makes it even more difficult to understand. But he's a _riot_. Which is hilarious in and of itself, because when he first walked in and was plugging his laptop in, etc., he seemed like the geekiest geek I've ever seen. He was wearing a short-sleeved plaid button-down shirt, has glasses, and a receding hairline that's mostly hidden by what could be considered bangs (not quite a combover, but give him ten years or so, and it will be). And he just seemed... mousy. But once he got into the swing he's really quite engaging and funny.

Now, the ironic thing is that normally it would be super-cool to have a Brit teaching an English class. But in this particular one, where we're talking about language and language use and phonetics... This is American English we're studying, of course, which he doesn't speak. But I'm sure we'll all find a way to work through it. I can already tell that _this_ is the class I should have taken instead of Intro to Linguistics. Like, *gasp* we actually have a real textbook, and are going to learn the IPA and everything.

Oh, but yes, him being funny. As he was talking about the differences between British and American English (slight tangent from phonetics and phonology), he told us that once while he was teaching at the University of Arizona, a male student came up to him and asked, "Can you teach me to talk like you? 'Cause chicks dig it." (srsly, can you imagine someone saying "'cause chicks dig it" in a British accent?) He said, "Of course, I did not teach him how, because I figured I didn't need that kind of competition." With a totally straight face.

And his example for ungrammatical syntax was a line from Yoda, whom he described as, "an oriental... Japanese sword-master, sort of esoteric sage... dude... thing."

Ah, this is going to be so much fun.
janetlin: (Laugh)
Hahahaha, my Linguistics and the English Language professor is _British_. But apparently he's been here for a while so his accent is sort of only halfway there, which makes it even more difficult to understand. But he's a _riot_. Which is hilarious in and of itself, because when he first walked in and was plugging his laptop in, etc., he seemed like the geekiest geek I've ever seen. He was wearing a short-sleeved plaid button-down shirt, has glasses, and a receding hairline that's mostly hidden by what could be considered bangs (not quite a combover, but give him ten years or so, and it will be). And he just seemed... mousy. But once he got into the swing he's really quite engaging and funny.

Now, the ironic thing is that normally it would be super-cool to have a Brit teaching an English class. But in this particular one, where we're talking about language and language use and phonetics... This is American English we're studying, of course, which he doesn't speak. But I'm sure we'll all find a way to work through it. I can already tell that _this_ is the class I should have taken instead of Intro to Linguistics. Like, *gasp* we actually have a real textbook, and are going to learn the IPA and everything.

Oh, but yes, him being funny. As he was talking about the differences between British and American English (slight tangent from phonetics and phonology), he told us that once while he was teaching at the University of Arizona, a male student came up to him and asked, "Can you teach me to talk like you? 'Cause chicks dig it." (srsly, can you imagine someone saying "'cause chicks dig it" in a British accent?) He said, "Of course, I did not teach him how, because I figured I didn't need that kind of competition." With a totally straight face.

And his example for ungrammatical syntax was a line from Yoda, whom he described as, "an oriental... Japanese sword-master, sort of esoteric sage... dude... thing."

Ah, this is going to be so much fun.
janetlin: (WoW servers are down)
What American accent do you have?
Created by Xavier on Memegen.net

Neutral. Not Northern, Southern, or Western, just American. Your national American identity is more important to you than your local identity, because you don't really have a local identity to begin with. Chances are, you live in a town where the majority of people are middle-class white people who vote Republican and have American flags attached to their houses. (Before you start strangling me, I didn't say -you- were like that, but that most people in your town are)

Take this quiz now - it's easy!
We're going to start with "cot" and "caught." When you say those words do they sound the same or different?






Hmm, how boring. Actually, that totally does sound like Amador County (funny, since I only lived there for six years and haven't lived there in seven). So it's either that or those "Acting Without an Accent" tapes/lessons while I was in theatre affected me more than I realized.

So, indistinguishable as my accent is, I find it amusing that the minute I said "hella" in a mass chat everyone was like, "NorCal!"

Oh and Kiwis (since most of you are), go for it and let's see where it places you. Heh.
janetlin: (WoW servers are down)
What American accent do you have?
Created by Xavier on Memegen.net

Neutral. Not Northern, Southern, or Western, just American. Your national American identity is more important to you than your local identity, because you don't really have a local identity to begin with. Chances are, you live in a town where the majority of people are middle-class white people who vote Republican and have American flags attached to their houses. (Before you start strangling me, I didn't say -you- were like that, but that most people in your town are)

Take this quiz now - it's easy!
We're going to start with "cot" and "caught." When you say those words do they sound the same or different?






Hmm, how boring. Actually, that totally does sound like Amador County (funny, since I only lived there for six years and haven't lived there in seven). So it's either that or those "Acting Without an Accent" tapes/lessons while I was in theatre affected me more than I realized.

So, indistinguishable as my accent is, I find it amusing that the minute I said "hella" in a mass chat everyone was like, "NorCal!"

Oh and Kiwis (since most of you are), go for it and let's see where it places you. Heh.
janetlin: (Don't mess)
Someone in my Linguistics class today asked, "What's a preposition?"

I shit you not.
janetlin: (Don't mess)
Someone in my Linguistics class today asked, "What's a preposition?"

I shit you not.

Ha!

Oct. 23rd, 2006 04:52 pm
janetlin: (Dancing Eddie)
I spent fifteen minutes after class today talking to (and *gasp* making friends with) my Linguistics teacher. And she says that I am "very advanced" and she has offered to write me a letter of recommendation to the Linguistics graduate program at UC Davis. Woot!

Ha!

Oct. 23rd, 2006 04:52 pm
janetlin: (Dancing Eddie)
I spent fifteen minutes after class today talking to (and *gasp* making friends with) my Linguistics teacher. And she says that I am "very advanced" and she has offered to write me a letter of recommendation to the Linguistics graduate program at UC Davis. Woot!
janetlin: (Teh sm4rt)
90.5 % on my Linguistics midterm today. Hell yeah.

skin of my teeth, but it's still an A!

ETA: She changed the scale, so now my grade is 92.5% Loverly.
janetlin: (Teh sm4rt)
90.5 % on my Linguistics midterm today. Hell yeah.

skin of my teeth, but it's still an A!

ETA: She changed the scale, so now my grade is 92.5% Loverly.

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