janetlin: (Reading)
Wow, it's been a long time since I did a 50 book challenge - or 24, as is much more reasonable for me. Well, I'm going to try again, because I miss reading, much as I enjoy everything I do online - and evidently I do a lot - it eats up a _whole_ lot of time, and my attention span is markedly shorter than it used to be, so this year I'm going to try to unplug more and find other ways to spend my time and engage my brain.

So, I picked up Star Trek, the novelization of the first reboot!verse movie, toward the end of last year, to help me write my Star Trek AU fic for the Rumbelle Secret Santa exchange on tumblr, and finished reading it last night.

It was... okay. Usually what I enjoy about movie novelizations are the extra bits of exposition in the narration that are either edited from the finished movie for time, or too subtle to notice onscreen. This novel didn't have many of those, so it was eh. I didn't get anything from reading it that I didn't already have from the movie, which at times made it hard to keep reading, especially after I was done writing my fic and no longer "needed" it.

Title: Star Trek
Author: Alan Dean Foster
Pages: 274



1 / 24 words. 4% done!
janetlin: (Zorro)
"These turbulent times." Don Diego sighed. "I would they were at an end. A man has no chance for meditation. There are moments when I think I shall ride far out in the hills, where there can be found no life except rattlesnakes and coyotes, and there spend a number of days. Only in that manner may a man meditate."

"Why meditate?" Gonzales cried. "Why not cease thought and take to action? What a man you would make, caballero, if you let your eye flash now and then, and quarreled a bit, and showed your teeth once in a while. What you need is a few bitter enemies."

"May the saints preserve us!" Don Diego cried.

"It is the truth, caballero! Fight a bit--make love to some Senorita--get drunk! Wake up and be a man!"

"Upon my soul! You almost persuade me, my sergeant. But --no. I never could endure the exertion."


~The Curse of Capistrano, Johnston McCulley

He's so deliciously useless! All he needs is like a lacy perfumed handkerchief to wave in front of his nose.

Also:

Don Carlos was for getting a blade and going at once to the presidio and challenging Captain Ramon to mortal combat; but Dona Catalina was more calm, and showed him that to do that would be to let the world know that their daughter had been affronted, and also it would not aid their fortunes any if Don Carlos quarreled with an officer of the army; and yet again the don was of an age, and the captain probably would run him through in two passes and leave Dona Catalina a weeping widow, which she did not wish to be.

Why hello there, Mrs. Bennett! :D
janetlin: (Zorro)
"These turbulent times." Don Diego sighed. "I would they were at an end. A man has no chance for meditation. There are moments when I think I shall ride far out in the hills, where there can be found no life except rattlesnakes and coyotes, and there spend a number of days. Only in that manner may a man meditate."

"Why meditate?" Gonzales cried. "Why not cease thought and take to action? What a man you would make, caballero, if you let your eye flash now and then, and quarreled a bit, and showed your teeth once in a while. What you need is a few bitter enemies."

"May the saints preserve us!" Don Diego cried.

"It is the truth, caballero! Fight a bit--make love to some Senorita--get drunk! Wake up and be a man!"

"Upon my soul! You almost persuade me, my sergeant. But --no. I never could endure the exertion."


~The Curse of Capistrano, Johnston McCulley

He's so deliciously useless! All he needs is like a lacy perfumed handkerchief to wave in front of his nose.

Also:

Don Carlos was for getting a blade and going at once to the presidio and challenging Captain Ramon to mortal combat; but Dona Catalina was more calm, and showed him that to do that would be to let the world know that their daughter had been affronted, and also it would not aid their fortunes any if Don Carlos quarreled with an officer of the army; and yet again the don was of an age, and the captain probably would run him through in two passes and leave Dona Catalina a weeping widow, which she did not wish to be.

Why hello there, Mrs. Bennett! :D
janetlin: (Teh sm4rt)
This volume contains "A Study in Scarlet" through "The Hound of the Baskervilles." I actually preferred the shorter stories in between (except for "The Final Problem"); the longer ones just seemed to drag. It took me two weeks, TWO WEEKS to read "The Hound of the Baskervilles," which is only 120 pages long.

On the whole, though, I have enjoyed the stories. I can imagine how much work it must have been to come up with so many different scenarios and solutions, and why Doyle hoped to escape it by killing off Sherlock. I'm curious to see if the stories in the second volume are of the same quality. And I'm looking forward to the movie despite whatever inaccuracies there are sure to be.

Title: The Complete Sherlock Holmes, volume 1
Author: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Pages: 695



9 / 24 books. 38% done!
janetlin: (Teh sm4rt)
This volume contains "A Study in Scarlet" through "The Hound of the Baskervilles." I actually preferred the shorter stories in between (except for "The Final Problem"); the longer ones just seemed to drag. It took me two weeks, TWO WEEKS to read "The Hound of the Baskervilles," which is only 120 pages long.

On the whole, though, I have enjoyed the stories. I can imagine how much work it must have been to come up with so many different scenarios and solutions, and why Doyle hoped to escape it by killing off Sherlock. I'm curious to see if the stories in the second volume are of the same quality. And I'm looking forward to the movie despite whatever inaccuracies there are sure to be.

Title: The Complete Sherlock Holmes, volume 1
Author: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Pages: 695



9 / 24 books. 38% done!
janetlin: (Books)
When I came back from my inadvertent hiatus I mentioned I'd been doing a lot of reading, but I won't spam you all with individual reviews, so here are some minis.

Spinning Straw Into Gold: What Fairy Tales Reveal About the Transformations in a Woman's Life, by Joan Gould. This was fascinating reading that shed light on why the same themes and archetypes keep popping up in fairy tales and mythologies from all over the world. What especially resonated with me was the Good Mother/Bad Mother thing (you know how the natural mother always dies in childbirth or soon thereafter and almost every fairy tale heroine is raised by an "evil stepmother"): how the Bad Mother serves a necessary purpose in pushing the heroine/princess out of her comfort zone which forces the girl to grow up. I am the child of a Good Mother, and until recently I never really thought that was a bad thing, but I can see where an "evil stepmother" might have done me some good while growing up.

World of Warcraft: Arthas: Rise of the Lich King by Christie Golden. Yes, seriously. I bought this to satisfy my curiosity until I could get the update for WoW. Apparently this backstory is pretty much what happened in Warcraft III, which I never played, so maybe it's not as new to others as it was to me, but it was very fun, classic tragedy about the fall of Prince Arthas, once a Paladin of the Light and now the Lich King, leader of the undead Scourge which are causing so much trouble for dear old Azeroth. One actually kind of sympathizes with him, and why he made the choices he did. Poor guy, only trying to save his people (why hello there, Boromir).

Fortune's Fool by Mercedes Lackey. Boy, I was really on a fantasy/fairy tale kick there, wasn't I? This one was primarily to see what all the fuss was about Lackey; probably not an author I ever need to read again, maybe some day if I need something fluffy and don't mind the near-purple prose. The book takes place in a land where fairy tales are real, and the people play by their "rules," conforming to archetypes like the Fortunate Fool, and falling victim to curses that have to be broken in particular ways. Rusalkas and unicorns and mermaids, oh my!

The Five Love Languages: How to Express Heartfelt Commitment to Your Mate by Gary Chapman. Something not related to fairy tales, but might help one towards a happily-ever-after nonetheless. We all speak different love languages - that is, perceive and express love in different ways. Some people are huggers, hand-holders, and knee-patters, others give gifts, or offer words of praise and admiration, or find ways to help or things to do for their loved ones. And others prefer simple quality time. Chances are, you and your partner do not speak the same love language, and if you do, it might not be the same "dialect" (Alan's version of quality time is doing something engaging like roleplaying or conversation, while mine is more passive like watching a movie or just sitting in the same room and reading). Understanding each of your languages can help you relate to each other, and give your partner what he/she wants and needs but might not know how to express: it's hard to tell someone who just brought you flowers (Gifts) that you'd prefer if they washed the dishes or took out the garbage instead (Acts of Service), or vice versa.



8 / 24 books. 33% done!
janetlin: (Books)
When I came back from my inadvertent hiatus I mentioned I'd been doing a lot of reading, but I won't spam you all with individual reviews, so here are some minis.

Spinning Straw Into Gold: What Fairy Tales Reveal About the Transformations in a Woman's Life, by Joan Gould. This was fascinating reading that shed light on why the same themes and archetypes keep popping up in fairy tales and mythologies from all over the world. What especially resonated with me was the Good Mother/Bad Mother thing (you know how the natural mother always dies in childbirth or soon thereafter and almost every fairy tale heroine is raised by an "evil stepmother"): how the Bad Mother serves a necessary purpose in pushing the heroine/princess out of her comfort zone which forces the girl to grow up. I am the child of a Good Mother, and until recently I never really thought that was a bad thing, but I can see where an "evil stepmother" might have done me some good while growing up.

World of Warcraft: Arthas: Rise of the Lich King by Christie Golden. Yes, seriously. I bought this to satisfy my curiosity until I could get the update for WoW. Apparently this backstory is pretty much what happened in Warcraft III, which I never played, so maybe it's not as new to others as it was to me, but it was very fun, classic tragedy about the fall of Prince Arthas, once a Paladin of the Light and now the Lich King, leader of the undead Scourge which are causing so much trouble for dear old Azeroth. One actually kind of sympathizes with him, and why he made the choices he did. Poor guy, only trying to save his people (why hello there, Boromir).

Fortune's Fool by Mercedes Lackey. Boy, I was really on a fantasy/fairy tale kick there, wasn't I? This one was primarily to see what all the fuss was about Lackey; probably not an author I ever need to read again, maybe some day if I need something fluffy and don't mind the near-purple prose. The book takes place in a land where fairy tales are real, and the people play by their "rules," conforming to archetypes like the Fortunate Fool, and falling victim to curses that have to be broken in particular ways. Rusalkas and unicorns and mermaids, oh my!

The Five Love Languages: How to Express Heartfelt Commitment to Your Mate by Gary Chapman. Something not related to fairy tales, but might help one towards a happily-ever-after nonetheless. We all speak different love languages - that is, perceive and express love in different ways. Some people are huggers, hand-holders, and knee-patters, others give gifts, or offer words of praise and admiration, or find ways to help or things to do for their loved ones. And others prefer simple quality time. Chances are, you and your partner do not speak the same love language, and if you do, it might not be the same "dialect" (Alan's version of quality time is doing something engaging like roleplaying or conversation, while mine is more passive like watching a movie or just sitting in the same room and reading). Understanding each of your languages can help you relate to each other, and give your partner what he/she wants and needs but might not know how to express: it's hard to tell someone who just brought you flowers (Gifts) that you'd prefer if they washed the dishes or took out the garbage instead (Acts of Service), or vice versa.



8 / 24 books. 33% done!
janetlin: (Reading)
This is the fifth in the Tarzan series, and there is conspicuously no mention of or even reference to his son with whom we spent the entirety of book 4. Odd. Maybe it's supposed to be, like, what happened to Tarzan and Jane _during_ those years that Jack and Meriem were tooling around the jungle. Maybe the sixth book will bring things together again and tell us just what is going on with this family.

Oh, but! I actually like Jane again. True, she's once again the damsel in distress, over whom everyone in the book _except_ Tarzan vies (he has amnesia). But she actually shows some backbone. She puts up a fight when Arab raiders come to kidnap her and destroy her home: "Upon the veranda Lady Greystoke stood, rifle in hand. More than a single raider had accounted to her steady nerves and cool aim for his outlawry; more than a single pony raced, riderless, in the wake of the charging horde." This is Jane. See Jane kick ass. Go Jane go! Of course, ultimately she fails in defending herself and her home and is whisked away (how else could Tarzan rescue her and prove his manly leet jungle-god skillz?), but she does manage to effect her own escape at one point, so I'm very proud of her.

The Evil European this time is Belgian, a murderer and deserter who masquerades as a Frenchman in order to cozy up to the Greystokes, initially to kidnap and ransom Jane, but subsequently to steal their fortune, which he learns comes from the treasure vaults of Opar.

Ooh, geeky sidenote: the gold of Opar is described as "oddly-shaped ingots" which reminded me of the wonky gold jewelry of the Deep Ones in "The Shadow Over Innsmouth." Also the priests of Opar are rather inhuman-looking (ahem, the Innsmouth look...), and prone to human sacrifice. _And_ Opar was supposedly a colony of Atlantis (insert lost, exotic maritime civilization here). So. Deep Ones in the Congo?? Hmm... Actually, if there was any influence, it would have gone the other way, as "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" was written twenty years later. But still. Now I want to watch Dagon again.

Anyway, this book has given me back my love of the Tarzan series. The Son of Tarzan frustrated me because it was just so much like the first book. Everything that Tarzan did in his youth, his son was now doing, and with all the same results. But now we finally have a different story and that's lovely. Even if it does get confusing trying to follow who's in possession of the Jewels, like a big Shell Game or something.

Title:Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar
Author: Edgar Rice Burroughs
Pages: 350

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
4 / 24
(16.7%)
janetlin: (Reading)
This is the fifth in the Tarzan series, and there is conspicuously no mention of or even reference to his son with whom we spent the entirety of book 4. Odd. Maybe it's supposed to be, like, what happened to Tarzan and Jane _during_ those years that Jack and Meriem were tooling around the jungle. Maybe the sixth book will bring things together again and tell us just what is going on with this family.

Oh, but! I actually like Jane again. True, she's once again the damsel in distress, over whom everyone in the book _except_ Tarzan vies (he has amnesia). But she actually shows some backbone. She puts up a fight when Arab raiders come to kidnap her and destroy her home: "Upon the veranda Lady Greystoke stood, rifle in hand. More than a single raider had accounted to her steady nerves and cool aim for his outlawry; more than a single pony raced, riderless, in the wake of the charging horde." This is Jane. See Jane kick ass. Go Jane go! Of course, ultimately she fails in defending herself and her home and is whisked away (how else could Tarzan rescue her and prove his manly leet jungle-god skillz?), but she does manage to effect her own escape at one point, so I'm very proud of her.

The Evil European this time is Belgian, a murderer and deserter who masquerades as a Frenchman in order to cozy up to the Greystokes, initially to kidnap and ransom Jane, but subsequently to steal their fortune, which he learns comes from the treasure vaults of Opar.

Ooh, geeky sidenote: the gold of Opar is described as "oddly-shaped ingots" which reminded me of the wonky gold jewelry of the Deep Ones in "The Shadow Over Innsmouth." Also the priests of Opar are rather inhuman-looking (ahem, the Innsmouth look...), and prone to human sacrifice. _And_ Opar was supposedly a colony of Atlantis (insert lost, exotic maritime civilization here). So. Deep Ones in the Congo?? Hmm... Actually, if there was any influence, it would have gone the other way, as "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" was written twenty years later. But still. Now I want to watch Dagon again.

Anyway, this book has given me back my love of the Tarzan series. The Son of Tarzan frustrated me because it was just so much like the first book. Everything that Tarzan did in his youth, his son was now doing, and with all the same results. But now we finally have a different story and that's lovely. Even if it does get confusing trying to follow who's in possession of the Jewels, like a big Shell Game or something.

Title:Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar
Author: Edgar Rice Burroughs
Pages: 350

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
4 / 24
(16.7%)
janetlin: (Default)
Catching up!

Wow, Narnia is done. I didn't expect it to happen so quickly. I mean, it's pretty much the same number of pages as the others, but it felt like it went faster. I think it only took me two days to read this one.

Not my favorite of the series, but still enjoyable. Actually, it's kind of hard to pin down exactly what I liked. I snerked at the instigator of all the trouble being an ape (jab at Darwinism?), and was of course heartbroken and frustrated when all the Narnian animals let him talk them into believing him (also possibly a comment on organized religion and how easily people allow themselves to just be swept along). I'm sure there's _lots_ of religious symbology and allusion, but I'm a little brain-drained because Morgan was sick last night. I look forward to her being old enough to read the Narnia books together with me and/or Alan.

Title: The Last Battle
Author: C.S. Lewis
Pages: 228

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3 / 24
(12.5%)
janetlin: (Default)
Catching up!

Wow, Narnia is done. I didn't expect it to happen so quickly. I mean, it's pretty much the same number of pages as the others, but it felt like it went faster. I think it only took me two days to read this one.

Not my favorite of the series, but still enjoyable. Actually, it's kind of hard to pin down exactly what I liked. I snerked at the instigator of all the trouble being an ape (jab at Darwinism?), and was of course heartbroken and frustrated when all the Narnian animals let him talk them into believing him (also possibly a comment on organized religion and how easily people allow themselves to just be swept along). I'm sure there's _lots_ of religious symbology and allusion, but I'm a little brain-drained because Morgan was sick last night. I look forward to her being old enough to read the Narnia books together with me and/or Alan.

Title: The Last Battle
Author: C.S. Lewis
Pages: 228

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3 / 24
(12.5%)
janetlin: (Reading)
Still quite behind in my readings. Something about having a husband around the house means I don't do as much sitting around and reading these days...

The Magician's Nephew was my favorite of the Narnia books for a long time. I think it's been supplanted by The Silver Chair now, though. Maybe because I remembered this one better before I started reading, and so nothing was as surprising and dramatic this time around. I still really love all the backstory and seeing how Narnia was created with all its animals, and of course Jadis. I don't recall the apple tree which was planted to protect Narnia ever figuring in any of the other books, though. Maybe it will show up in The Last Battle, which is now the only one of the Narnia books which I haven't read. Onward!

Title: The Magician's Nephew
Author: C.S. Lewis
Pages: 221

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2 / 24
(8.3%)
janetlin: (Reading)
Still quite behind in my readings. Something about having a husband around the house means I don't do as much sitting around and reading these days...

The Magician's Nephew was my favorite of the Narnia books for a long time. I think it's been supplanted by The Silver Chair now, though. Maybe because I remembered this one better before I started reading, and so nothing was as surprising and dramatic this time around. I still really love all the backstory and seeing how Narnia was created with all its animals, and of course Jadis. I don't recall the apple tree which was planted to protect Narnia ever figuring in any of the other books, though. Maybe it will show up in The Last Battle, which is now the only one of the Narnia books which I haven't read. Onward!

Title: The Magician's Nephew
Author: C.S. Lewis
Pages: 221

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2 / 24
(8.3%)
janetlin: (Books)
Off to a late start this year. I dunno, for some reason January just didn't really lend itself to much free time and reading. Can't imagine why. ;)

This is the fourth in the Tarzan series, and follows young (it never says, but I think he's like ten or eleven when the book starts) Jack Clayton, who is kidnapped by one of the Russian baddies from the last book, but ends up escaping into the jungle and following - kind of literally - in his father's footsteps. Never mind that he's spent his whole life up to now a pampered aristocrat in London, he's the son of friggin' TARZAN and that means he's automatically capable of everything his father is capable of. *eyeroll* Personally, I think Jack's more than a little silly in not returning home once he escaped, but then there'd be no story, right?

It's starting to feel repetitive and formulaic, but dammit I'm still addicted for some reason. This book at least is an improvement over the last in that it doesn't break its own stride by pulling away from Jack/Korak's story to try and concurrently tell what Tarzan and Jane - excuse me, Lord and Lady Greystoke - are doing in the wake of their son's disappearance. Though, as a parent, I was of course passionately curious about their reactions and to what lengths Tarzan the Great would go to get his son back, but that wasn't the focus of this story. I have to say that I don't like Lady Greystoke as much as I liked Jane Porter. Marriage and motherhood haven't done great things for her character. I hope the same fate doesn't befall Meriem after she marries Jack.

Title: The Son of Tarzan
Author: Edgar Rice Burroughs
Pages: 315

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1 / 24
(4.2%)
janetlin: (Books)
Off to a late start this year. I dunno, for some reason January just didn't really lend itself to much free time and reading. Can't imagine why. ;)

This is the fourth in the Tarzan series, and follows young (it never says, but I think he's like ten or eleven when the book starts) Jack Clayton, who is kidnapped by one of the Russian baddies from the last book, but ends up escaping into the jungle and following - kind of literally - in his father's footsteps. Never mind that he's spent his whole life up to now a pampered aristocrat in London, he's the son of friggin' TARZAN and that means he's automatically capable of everything his father is capable of. *eyeroll* Personally, I think Jack's more than a little silly in not returning home once he escaped, but then there'd be no story, right?

It's starting to feel repetitive and formulaic, but dammit I'm still addicted for some reason. This book at least is an improvement over the last in that it doesn't break its own stride by pulling away from Jack/Korak's story to try and concurrently tell what Tarzan and Jane - excuse me, Lord and Lady Greystoke - are doing in the wake of their son's disappearance. Though, as a parent, I was of course passionately curious about their reactions and to what lengths Tarzan the Great would go to get his son back, but that wasn't the focus of this story. I have to say that I don't like Lady Greystoke as much as I liked Jane Porter. Marriage and motherhood haven't done great things for her character. I hope the same fate doesn't befall Meriem after she marries Jack.

Title: The Son of Tarzan
Author: Edgar Rice Burroughs
Pages: 315

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1 / 24
(4.2%)
janetlin: (Books)
A much belated report, but I finished this on the 28th or 29th of December, and it was my last book for the year. 5 more than 2007; not as many as I would have liked, but when I started 2008 I didn't know I would do NaNoWriMo and thus effectively remove an entire month from my calendar.

So anyway. I'd seen this series talked about, and finally my curiosity got to the point that I actually bought Outlander. And I love it. It's very... kind of grown-up fantasy, in contrast to the Pern books (which I do intend to continue with). Possibly because it's less fantastical fantasy and more like good old historical fiction. The protagonist just _happens_ to have traveled back in time. The first time I heard about these books, I admit I was skeptical. She falls through a standing stone and ends up in the past? And just happens to _have_ to get married to this handsome young highlander? Oh but she's already married in her own time, teh angst! It _sounded_ like bad fanfiction. But I"m so glad I gave it a chance because it's written just beautifully and manages to be completely believable. I think this is proof that even a somewhat cheesy premise, in the right hands, can turn into something amazing.

And I agree with [livejournal.com profile] crymeariver_ - Captain Randall is _totally_ Jason Isaacs.

Title: Outlander
Author: Diana Gabaldon
Pages: 627



29 / 36 books. 81% done!

Full stats report for the year when I get home.

EDIT:
Fantasy 62%
Sci Fi 3%
Horror 3%
Historical Fiction 24%
Romance 21%
Drama 45%
Classic 45%
Action 14%
Assigned 34%
Nonfiction 7%
Play 7%

Average pages 298

Pretty good spread. I owe a lot of my fantasy reading to my Fantasy and Romance class from the spring semester.
janetlin: (Books)
A much belated report, but I finished this on the 28th or 29th of December, and it was my last book for the year. 5 more than 2007; not as many as I would have liked, but when I started 2008 I didn't know I would do NaNoWriMo and thus effectively remove an entire month from my calendar.

So anyway. I'd seen this series talked about, and finally my curiosity got to the point that I actually bought Outlander. And I love it. It's very... kind of grown-up fantasy, in contrast to the Pern books (which I do intend to continue with). Possibly because it's less fantastical fantasy and more like good old historical fiction. The protagonist just _happens_ to have traveled back in time. The first time I heard about these books, I admit I was skeptical. She falls through a standing stone and ends up in the past? And just happens to _have_ to get married to this handsome young highlander? Oh but she's already married in her own time, teh angst! It _sounded_ like bad fanfiction. But I"m so glad I gave it a chance because it's written just beautifully and manages to be completely believable. I think this is proof that even a somewhat cheesy premise, in the right hands, can turn into something amazing.

And I agree with [livejournal.com profile] crymeariver_ - Captain Randall is _totally_ Jason Isaacs.

Title: Outlander
Author: Diana Gabaldon
Pages: 627



29 / 36 books. 81% done!

Full stats report for the year when I get home.

EDIT:
Fantasy 62%
Sci Fi 3%
Horror 3%
Historical Fiction 24%
Romance 21%
Drama 45%
Classic 45%
Action 14%
Assigned 34%
Nonfiction 7%
Play 7%

Average pages 298

Pretty good spread. I owe a lot of my fantasy reading to my Fantasy and Romance class from the spring semester.
janetlin: (Reading)
Now that NaNoWriMo is over I can actually get back to reading! Also now that I've taken my one final and the semester is therefore over. Wheee!

So the book was enjoyable, but I felt a little disappointed. I thought there would be more to it; either more details in the stories we already knew from DH, or more stories, perhaps ones that weren't already mentioned. I know, I'm horribly ungrateful. If I were Rowling and I gave this lovely little gift to my fandom, and they bitched about it not being enough, I'm not sure what I'd do. But the fact remains that I didn't find it quite up to expectations from all the hubbub about it - either in its original special edition, or after hearing reports that _preorders_ for the standard edition outsold Twilight.

"Dumbledore's" notes and commentary throughout were a nice little surprise, though they don't give much deeper insight to the wizarding world (which are the parts _I_ enjoy about the HP books. Aside from, y'know, the Malfoys).

Title: The Tales of Beedle the Bard
Author: JK Rowling
Pages: 107



28 / 36 books. 78% done!
janetlin: (Reading)
Now that NaNoWriMo is over I can actually get back to reading! Also now that I've taken my one final and the semester is therefore over. Wheee!

So the book was enjoyable, but I felt a little disappointed. I thought there would be more to it; either more details in the stories we already knew from DH, or more stories, perhaps ones that weren't already mentioned. I know, I'm horribly ungrateful. If I were Rowling and I gave this lovely little gift to my fandom, and they bitched about it not being enough, I'm not sure what I'd do. But the fact remains that I didn't find it quite up to expectations from all the hubbub about it - either in its original special edition, or after hearing reports that _preorders_ for the standard edition outsold Twilight.

"Dumbledore's" notes and commentary throughout were a nice little surprise, though they don't give much deeper insight to the wizarding world (which are the parts _I_ enjoy about the HP books. Aside from, y'know, the Malfoys).

Title: The Tales of Beedle the Bard
Author: JK Rowling
Pages: 107



28 / 36 books. 78% done!
janetlin: (Booky dragon)
Wow, this one took a long time to get started. I was seriously thinking about setting it aside and reading the third book in the Harper Hall trilogy first, since most of this book takes place after that one. But after page 100-something, it actually picked up and started showing some signs of a plot. Yay! Now I'm even more excited about reading Dragondrums to learn firsthand what happened and fill in the holes made by all the oblique references here. And to find out what the heck happened to one character in particular since the last time I read about him in Dragonsinger. He seems to have changed a _lot_ and it'll be interesting to watch it happen.

Eventually more headway is made into discovering the mysterious origins of Pern, and little details are starting to be familiar and fit into what I already know (but only dimly remember) from reading All the Weyrs of Pern years ago (before I was pregnant with Morgan).

Title: The White Dragon
Author: Anne McCaffrey
Pages: 445



27 / 36 books. 75% done!

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