janetlin: (On stage)
On Wednesday my duet partner (Jim) and I performed our scene in Shakespeare class. It was the first day of performances and we chose to go first to get it out of the way. So we go up, do our thing as Benedick and Beatrice in the wake of the aborted wedding, and take our bows as the class applauded. Then as the claps died down there was this collective groan and some guy in the back of the room said, "Man, who wants to follow that?" :D The teacher then led a little bit of discussion and asked what stood out about the scene, and another guy said, "Just, the natural chemistry. It was... wow." And a girl (whom I later realized was in one of the groups to follow us that day) said, "It was really believable. Like, disgustingly good," and the guy who sits kitty-corner to me replied, "Yeah, thanks for setting the bar, guys." :D:D:D So then two more groups presented, both on DVD instead of in person, and yeeeah. Granted, it's a lit class, not theatre, and we aren't _really_ being graded on acting ability or the aesthetic value of our performances. But it's almost a week later and I still haven't stopped grinning about it. As we were standing up to leave class that day, Jim leaned over to me and said quietly, "You know, I feel bad for saying it, but I kind of loved that sound of dismay." Yes indeed. Man, I thought applause was intoxicating. I really miss theatre now.

Got my second essay in American Lit back today (also turned in late), and the teacher had "quibbles" at my representation of Columbus as some soulless, selfish materialist, but "Of all the 50A papers I've read this semester, this one stands out for its nice writing, its clarity of purpose and expression, and its compelling argument. Overall a very fine paper!" 14 out of 15 points. *is smug* Man, I wish she taught Composition!
janetlin: (On stage)
On Wednesday my duet partner (Jim) and I performed our scene in Shakespeare class. It was the first day of performances and we chose to go first to get it out of the way. So we go up, do our thing as Benedick and Beatrice in the wake of the aborted wedding, and take our bows as the class applauded. Then as the claps died down there was this collective groan and some guy in the back of the room said, "Man, who wants to follow that?" :D The teacher then led a little bit of discussion and asked what stood out about the scene, and another guy said, "Just, the natural chemistry. It was... wow." And a girl (whom I later realized was in one of the groups to follow us that day) said, "It was really believable. Like, disgustingly good," and the guy who sits kitty-corner to me replied, "Yeah, thanks for setting the bar, guys." :D:D:D So then two more groups presented, both on DVD instead of in person, and yeeeah. Granted, it's a lit class, not theatre, and we aren't _really_ being graded on acting ability or the aesthetic value of our performances. But it's almost a week later and I still haven't stopped grinning about it. As we were standing up to leave class that day, Jim leaned over to me and said quietly, "You know, I feel bad for saying it, but I kind of loved that sound of dismay." Yes indeed. Man, I thought applause was intoxicating. I really miss theatre now.

Got my second essay in American Lit back today (also turned in late), and the teacher had "quibbles" at my representation of Columbus as some soulless, selfish materialist, but "Of all the 50A papers I've read this semester, this one stands out for its nice writing, its clarity of purpose and expression, and its compelling argument. Overall a very fine paper!" 14 out of 15 points. *is smug* Man, I wish she taught Composition!
janetlin: (Default)
Here's what my next two weeks look like:

sometime soon: register for spring classes before History of the English Language fills up.
Tuesday, 2 December: 3-4 page essay for American Lit, Environmental Science final
Wednesday, 3 December: 5-6 page research essay for Shakespeare (note to self: pick a topic and do research)

Tuesday, 9 December: 10 page research project and Powerpoint presentation for Environmental Science (guess I should learn how to use Powerpoint, eh?) (also note to self: pick a topic and do research)
Wednesday, 10 December: 5-minute duet for Shakespeare w/ 4 page essay about the project
Thursday, 11 December: American Lit final
Friday, 12 December: 9:15 appointment for Morgan at Shriner's Hospital, Morgan school Christmas pageant (moved forward a week so that she could participate), family early Christmas

Sunday, 14 December: fly to New Zealand

And then it'll just be easy-breezy, no stress vacationy stuff.

Right.
janetlin: (Default)
Here's what my next two weeks look like:

sometime soon: register for spring classes before History of the English Language fills up.
Tuesday, 2 December: 3-4 page essay for American Lit, Environmental Science final
Wednesday, 3 December: 5-6 page research essay for Shakespeare (note to self: pick a topic and do research)

Tuesday, 9 December: 10 page research project and Powerpoint presentation for Environmental Science (guess I should learn how to use Powerpoint, eh?) (also note to self: pick a topic and do research)
Wednesday, 10 December: 5-minute duet for Shakespeare w/ 4 page essay about the project
Thursday, 11 December: American Lit final
Friday, 12 December: 9:15 appointment for Morgan at Shriner's Hospital, Morgan school Christmas pageant (moved forward a week so that she could participate), family early Christmas

Sunday, 14 December: fly to New Zealand

And then it'll just be easy-breezy, no stress vacationy stuff.

Right.
janetlin: (Writing)
Whew, after three days of zero productivity, I finally get some words down. NaNo said my words per day to finish in time was 2279 today, and I squeezed out 2537 (which, btw, is my second highest daily count to date). Yay! That's not a _whole_ lot of ground made up, and NaNo is still counting Wednesday the 26th as a day in which to write 2,000+ words, and it will likely be another negligible production day. Also, I have a draft of a research essay due for workshop in my Shakespeare class on Monday. Yeah. I'll give you two guesses how far along in that I am as of this moment.

In happier news, the Environmental Science final I have down on my calendar as beign on the 25th has been moved to Dec 2nd. Huzzah.

In the meantime, though, I'm going to roll around in the pretty green box on my calendar here.



Whee, the NaNo Validator is up and says I have more words than MSWord does! _Much_ nicer than going the other way...
janetlin: (Writing)
Whew, after three days of zero productivity, I finally get some words down. NaNo said my words per day to finish in time was 2279 today, and I squeezed out 2537 (which, btw, is my second highest daily count to date). Yay! That's not a _whole_ lot of ground made up, and NaNo is still counting Wednesday the 26th as a day in which to write 2,000+ words, and it will likely be another negligible production day. Also, I have a draft of a research essay due for workshop in my Shakespeare class on Monday. Yeah. I'll give you two guesses how far along in that I am as of this moment.

In happier news, the Environmental Science final I have down on my calendar as beign on the 25th has been moved to Dec 2nd. Huzzah.

In the meantime, though, I'm going to roll around in the pretty green box on my calendar here.



Whee, the NaNo Validator is up and says I have more words than MSWord does! _Much_ nicer than going the other way...
janetlin: (Shakespeare)
(Have also in the meantime read Henry IV part I and A Midsummer Night's Dream for my Shakespeare class, but since I read those last year I won't count them. Same will go for The Merchant of Venice, which is up next.)

It amazes me that I spent _months_ in rehearsals for this play back in high school and missed so much of what was going on. Don Pedro flirting with Beatrice?! How'd I miss that? And speaking of Beatrice, I can now say that I do indeed think Portia is cooler. Not by _too_ much, and actually the only difference is that Beatrice wails to Benedick to duel Claudio until he concedes, whereas Portia would have just rolled up in drag and done it herself. ;)

And alas, among all the greater insight I now have into this play, I still think Hero is a cardboard cutout: insert good-girl daughter of venerable old man and love interest for hot young soldier here. Really there's not much else to her character. I guess Shakespeare was either saving himself for writing such awesome females in The Merchant of Venice or had already shot his load doing so.

Title: Much Ado About Nothing
Author: William Shakespeare
Pages: 197



26 / 36 books. 72% done!
janetlin: (Shakespeare)
(Have also in the meantime read Henry IV part I and A Midsummer Night's Dream for my Shakespeare class, but since I read those last year I won't count them. Same will go for The Merchant of Venice, which is up next.)

It amazes me that I spent _months_ in rehearsals for this play back in high school and missed so much of what was going on. Don Pedro flirting with Beatrice?! How'd I miss that? And speaking of Beatrice, I can now say that I do indeed think Portia is cooler. Not by _too_ much, and actually the only difference is that Beatrice wails to Benedick to duel Claudio until he concedes, whereas Portia would have just rolled up in drag and done it herself. ;)

And alas, among all the greater insight I now have into this play, I still think Hero is a cardboard cutout: insert good-girl daughter of venerable old man and love interest for hot young soldier here. Really there's not much else to her character. I guess Shakespeare was either saving himself for writing such awesome females in The Merchant of Venice or had already shot his load doing so.

Title: Much Ado About Nothing
Author: William Shakespeare
Pages: 197



26 / 36 books. 72% done!
janetlin: (Embarrassed)
Yesterday during American Lit I snuck out to use the bathroom. I walked down the side of the room and opened and closed the door quietly so as not to disrupt anything. Same for when I came back, except as soon as I opened the door, my teacher looks over at me and says, "Sierra, I think you missed a call on your phone."

Someone from the back of the room pipes up, "But we like your ringtone!"

*facepalm*
janetlin: (Embarrassed)
Yesterday during American Lit I snuck out to use the bathroom. I walked down the side of the room and opened and closed the door quietly so as not to disrupt anything. Same for when I came back, except as soon as I opened the door, my teacher looks over at me and says, "Sierra, I think you missed a call on your phone."

Someone from the back of the room pipes up, "But we like your ringtone!"

*facepalm*
janetlin: (Shakespeare)
This is the only play for my "Shakespeare's Early Plays" class which I haven't already read and/or performed. And I actually liked it quite a lot. Read it in one sitting, out of my stonking huge Complete Works of Shakespeare because the bookstore was out of the little paperbacks.

Richard himself... I'm kind of ambivalent. Sometimes he's obnoxiously selfish, others he's unbearably mopy "Let us sit upon the ground / and tell sad stories of the deaths of kings," and I only really sympathized with him toward the very end when he's saying farewell to his wife and they can't stop kissing each other (it's really adorable). But the more we talked about it in class, I started equating his bipolar antics with this notion of the king's two bodies. When he's up, he's the King-with-a-capital-K and life is good, and when he's down he's just poor (and mortal) Richard, king-with-a-lower-case-k. Also he might have secret wells of badassery because he singlehandedly killed two or three would-be murderers while he was imprisoned in the Tower.

And then sometimes I felt like I was reading the Henry Bolingbroke (later Henry IV) show. Which is understandable since this is the prequel to that play, but it reminds me of how frustrated I was reading Henry IV, part 1 and feeling like I was watching the Prince Hal show. And oh, yes, that's the next play on our reading list. *facepalm* Maybe on second reading it won't be as much of a slog as it was last time.

Title: Richard II
Author: William Shakespeare
Pages: 352



21 / 24 books. 88% done!
janetlin: (Shakespeare)
This is the only play for my "Shakespeare's Early Plays" class which I haven't already read and/or performed. And I actually liked it quite a lot. Read it in one sitting, out of my stonking huge Complete Works of Shakespeare because the bookstore was out of the little paperbacks.

Richard himself... I'm kind of ambivalent. Sometimes he's obnoxiously selfish, others he's unbearably mopy "Let us sit upon the ground / and tell sad stories of the deaths of kings," and I only really sympathized with him toward the very end when he's saying farewell to his wife and they can't stop kissing each other (it's really adorable). But the more we talked about it in class, I started equating his bipolar antics with this notion of the king's two bodies. When he's up, he's the King-with-a-capital-K and life is good, and when he's down he's just poor (and mortal) Richard, king-with-a-lower-case-k. Also he might have secret wells of badassery because he singlehandedly killed two or three would-be murderers while he was imprisoned in the Tower.

And then sometimes I felt like I was reading the Henry Bolingbroke (later Henry IV) show. Which is understandable since this is the prequel to that play, but it reminds me of how frustrated I was reading Henry IV, part 1 and feeling like I was watching the Prince Hal show. And oh, yes, that's the next play on our reading list. *facepalm* Maybe on second reading it won't be as much of a slog as it was last time.

Title: Richard II
Author: William Shakespeare
Pages: 352



21 / 24 books. 88% done!
janetlin: (Dancing Tauren)
One of my classes this semester was "Structure of English." Yes, that's grammar. Because sadly, even university students don't always know the difference between a preposition and a pronoun. *rolleyes* _I_, however, was incredibly bored with the classes, and it didn't look like they were going to get any more challenging, so last week I asked my professor if I could challenge the class.

*For y'all in other countries that don't allow this, it means one takes the final exam early and if you get a passing grade, that's the grade you have for the entire class and you don't have to show up to lectures or do the homework or anything because you _obviously_ already know the material.

She said she'd had lots of students ask to do so, and only one had ever earned an A (I need to get at least a B), but I was welcome to try, and "I already have a sense that you've got a pretty good grasp of grammar." :D But she still seemed a little surprised that I even asked, and even more so when I was like, "How about next week?" No, seriously, lady, I'm that confident. Also I don't want my flakiness regarding homework to adversely affect what should otherwise be an insultingly easy A

So last night I pulled out my old Harbrace Handbook (just in case) and skimmed the whole thing in a few hours, and took the test this morning and ACED that sumbitch. Not a perfect score; I missed five points which gave me 93% overall. But still. *spastic happy dance*

There were sections like, "Identify what is incorrect about the following sentences (comma splice, adjective/adverb confusion, dangling modifier, etc)" and "Write a sentence correctly using each of the following words," and the words were commonly confused ones like effect, affect, its, it's, imminent, eminent, etc. For srs, guys. She liked the sentences I came up with, and said she'd keep them for examples when the class gets to that chapter. *preens*

Oh, and the final section was to write a paragraph of around ten sentences which explains how to do something. So I wrote about maneuvering in a hoop skirt. :D Probably _not_ what she was expecting to read today.

So yeah, one less class I have to sit through, a whole lot less homework I have to do, and more time at home to do homework for my other classes. Woot!
janetlin: (Dancing Tauren)
One of my classes this semester was "Structure of English." Yes, that's grammar. Because sadly, even university students don't always know the difference between a preposition and a pronoun. *rolleyes* _I_, however, was incredibly bored with the classes, and it didn't look like they were going to get any more challenging, so last week I asked my professor if I could challenge the class.

*For y'all in other countries that don't allow this, it means one takes the final exam early and if you get a passing grade, that's the grade you have for the entire class and you don't have to show up to lectures or do the homework or anything because you _obviously_ already know the material.

She said she'd had lots of students ask to do so, and only one had ever earned an A (I need to get at least a B), but I was welcome to try, and "I already have a sense that you've got a pretty good grasp of grammar." :D But she still seemed a little surprised that I even asked, and even more so when I was like, "How about next week?" No, seriously, lady, I'm that confident. Also I don't want my flakiness regarding homework to adversely affect what should otherwise be an insultingly easy A

So last night I pulled out my old Harbrace Handbook (just in case) and skimmed the whole thing in a few hours, and took the test this morning and ACED that sumbitch. Not a perfect score; I missed five points which gave me 93% overall. But still. *spastic happy dance*

There were sections like, "Identify what is incorrect about the following sentences (comma splice, adjective/adverb confusion, dangling modifier, etc)" and "Write a sentence correctly using each of the following words," and the words were commonly confused ones like effect, affect, its, it's, imminent, eminent, etc. For srs, guys. She liked the sentences I came up with, and said she'd keep them for examples when the class gets to that chapter. *preens*

Oh, and the final section was to write a paragraph of around ten sentences which explains how to do something. So I wrote about maneuvering in a hoop skirt. :D Probably _not_ what she was expecting to read today.

So yeah, one less class I have to sit through, a whole lot less homework I have to do, and more time at home to do homework for my other classes. Woot!
janetlin: (Books)
I have now read something by Neil Gaiman. Also, now Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is no longer the only book I've ever read in a single day. Coraline is super-short and I read it actually just in one sitting, the night before the day we began discussing it in Fantasy & Romance.

I haven't yet had any nightmares from it, but I expect them any night. It's _creepy_!! Coraline is a young girl who discovers that the door in her family's drawing room - which her parents believe opens only upon a brick wall - leads to another world. One where the people have black buttons for eyes and All Is Not Well. Back in the day I read the Goosebumps books and thought nothing of them. I suppose I just haven't read anything scary in a while so my defenses were down. A good story, apart from the creepy factor, so maybe one I'll some day recommend to Morgan if she's into that sort of thing.

Title: Coraline
Author: Neil Gaiman (by the way, is it "Guy-man" or "Gay-man"?)
Pages: 192



13 / 24 books. 54% done!
janetlin: (Books)
I have now read something by Neil Gaiman. Also, now Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is no longer the only book I've ever read in a single day. Coraline is super-short and I read it actually just in one sitting, the night before the day we began discussing it in Fantasy & Romance.

I haven't yet had any nightmares from it, but I expect them any night. It's _creepy_!! Coraline is a young girl who discovers that the door in her family's drawing room - which her parents believe opens only upon a brick wall - leads to another world. One where the people have black buttons for eyes and All Is Not Well. Back in the day I read the Goosebumps books and thought nothing of them. I suppose I just haven't read anything scary in a while so my defenses were down. A good story, apart from the creepy factor, so maybe one I'll some day recommend to Morgan if she's into that sort of thing.

Title: Coraline
Author: Neil Gaiman (by the way, is it "Guy-man" or "Gay-man"?)
Pages: 192



13 / 24 books. 54% done!
janetlin: (Pretty)
Wow, I'm reading way faster than I did last year. I may someday make it up to fifty books in a year after all. Just not this year...

This is another for Fantasy & Romance. I was pleasantly surprised to find out how little the cartoon movie deviated from the book. Some of the dialogue is exactly the same, and the only major edit I noticed was the movie's omission of the town of Hagsgate, which is totally understandable since if I had to edit the book for "time" that would be the bit to go. Oh and they also cut out a bit of Schmendrick's backstory which I think they probably should have kept because it explained what a _really_ big deal him transforming the unicorn was, and also Molly's line to him about "all that matters to you is becoming a real magician at last." Not even the book gives us Molly's backstory, though. Boo. I've always been curious about how she went from being a young woman waiting for unicorns to Captain Cully's... whatever she was to him.

I liked the book just as much as I've always liked the movie, and will keep this one to read to Morgan when her attention span is a little more amenable to chaptered stories.

Title: The Last Unicorn
Author: Peter S. Beagle
Pages: 304



12 / 24 books. 50% done!
janetlin: (Pretty)
Wow, I'm reading way faster than I did last year. I may someday make it up to fifty books in a year after all. Just not this year...

This is another for Fantasy & Romance. I was pleasantly surprised to find out how little the cartoon movie deviated from the book. Some of the dialogue is exactly the same, and the only major edit I noticed was the movie's omission of the town of Hagsgate, which is totally understandable since if I had to edit the book for "time" that would be the bit to go. Oh and they also cut out a bit of Schmendrick's backstory which I think they probably should have kept because it explained what a _really_ big deal him transforming the unicorn was, and also Molly's line to him about "all that matters to you is becoming a real magician at last." Not even the book gives us Molly's backstory, though. Boo. I've always been curious about how she went from being a young woman waiting for unicorns to Captain Cully's... whatever she was to him.

I liked the book just as much as I've always liked the movie, and will keep this one to read to Morgan when her attention span is a little more amenable to chaptered stories.

Title: The Last Unicorn
Author: Peter S. Beagle
Pages: 304



12 / 24 books. 50% done!
janetlin: (English major)
Huh. Apparently I had forgotten to write about reading Wuthering Heights for British Lit. Oops!

This wasn't the first time I read it, though I think I might not have finished it the last time because we hit a point where things stopped sounding familiar. I remember feeling that it didn't make very much sense to me (the Cathy/Catherine thing, because I remember thinking, "Is she dead or isn't she?!"), and it at least made a bit more sense now. Plus I watched it on Netflix to give myself some reference.

In class discussions my page numbers were off because I was using the edition I'd bought at Shakespeare & Co. in Paris, after seeing Hurlevent at the Palais Garnier. We arrived just as it was starting so I didn't have a chance to read the program ahead of time, but as the dancers were moving through the story, I remember thinking that it felt familiar. Then at intermission I read and found out it was Wuthering Heights ("hurlevent" apparently ~= "wuthering"). Aha. Suddenly I knew what was going on, and quite enjoyed the rest of the show.

I'm still not completely sold on the book, though. It's too dark for me and moves _very_ slowly and I just want to take each and every character by the shoulders and give them a good hard shake, if not an outright slap. I feel badly for the Lintons because Cathy & Heathcliff really quite messed up their lives. Not content to be miserable themselves, they have to spread it as far and wide as they can. Really sort of the theme for the whole book...

Title: Wuthering Heights
Author: Emily Bronte
Pages: 417



11 / 24 books. 46% done!
janetlin: (English major)
Huh. Apparently I had forgotten to write about reading Wuthering Heights for British Lit. Oops!

This wasn't the first time I read it, though I think I might not have finished it the last time because we hit a point where things stopped sounding familiar. I remember feeling that it didn't make very much sense to me (the Cathy/Catherine thing, because I remember thinking, "Is she dead or isn't she?!"), and it at least made a bit more sense now. Plus I watched it on Netflix to give myself some reference.

In class discussions my page numbers were off because I was using the edition I'd bought at Shakespeare & Co. in Paris, after seeing Hurlevent at the Palais Garnier. We arrived just as it was starting so I didn't have a chance to read the program ahead of time, but as the dancers were moving through the story, I remember thinking that it felt familiar. Then at intermission I read and found out it was Wuthering Heights ("hurlevent" apparently ~= "wuthering"). Aha. Suddenly I knew what was going on, and quite enjoyed the rest of the show.

I'm still not completely sold on the book, though. It's too dark for me and moves _very_ slowly and I just want to take each and every character by the shoulders and give them a good hard shake, if not an outright slap. I feel badly for the Lintons because Cathy & Heathcliff really quite messed up their lives. Not content to be miserable themselves, they have to spread it as far and wide as they can. Really sort of the theme for the whole book...

Title: Wuthering Heights
Author: Emily Bronte
Pages: 417



11 / 24 books. 46% done!

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